Though they each have a list of acting credits prior, Brandee Evans and Nicco Annan have exploded in popularity since the Summer 2020 release of STARZ’s hit stripper drama, P-Valley

Now, with Season 2 finally available to stream on July 3, they’re each getting used to all the attention they receive when out and about from members of the “Pynk Posse,” hardcore P-Valley fans. 

“It’s like going to a family reunion,” Annan says of his ever-growing fan base. Being constantly greeted warmly in the streets by people enamored with Uncle Clifford, he says is like meeting cousin after cousin. 

“I echo Nicco. That’s exactly what it feels like,” Evans added. “It doesn’t feel like fans, it’s like family. It’s definitely about how they interact with us as well. I’ll be out and they’re like “Hey, girl!” and I catch myself saying it back – “Hey, girl!” then I realize, we ain’t never met!” 

“It is [beautiful], especially because of the topic of the show,” Annan said of the public embrace. “People think ‘oh, it’s a strip club,’ and ‘what are these characters?’ There’s a lot of pre-judgment that can go on.”

As career-stripper Mercedes and nonbinary femme club owner Uncle Clifford, each of the actors portrays members of society fraught with presumptions and stereotypes. But through the 8-episode run of Season 1, millions who may not have previously done so began to look at people in different walks of life with a new viewpoint.

“I think it’s a testament to the work, to the artistry, and the craftsmanship that goes into it that people are able to see beyond their own narrowmindedness and expand their hearts and have empathy for people that look a little bit different than them.”

Indeed, P-Valley has opened up conversations and placed a lens on topics often seen as taboo and individuals often regulated to the fringes of society. Highlighting the day-to-day joys and plights of exotic dancers like Mercedes and queer/nonbinary characters like Uncle Clifford has provided a humanizing aspect to identities that people often judge sight unseen. Like Annan, Evans credits the writing and the keenly honest eye of P-Valley showrunner Katori Hall for making content people from all walks of life can easily relate to. 

“I believe we’re just digging more into the truth,” Evans said. “When you stick to the truth, then it’s going to resonate with people. Katori sticks to the truth, be it hard, sad, uncomfortable, fun all of it.”

“That’s why I think it’s reaching everyone because you know someone that knows someone – even if you don’t know them – ‘oh, I’ve heard of someone similar to a Mercedes or an Uncle Clifford, an Autumn Night or a Ms. Mississippi’,” Evans added. “So I believe that’s what makes it so close to home. Especially in Season 2 – we all lived through it, across the world.” 

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