Kemp Calls Abrams’ Refusal To Concede “A Disgrace”

Paul Zimmerman

Despite calls to give up the fight, Abrams is keeping her head in the game.
Tanya A. Christian Nov, 12, 2018

It’s been nearly a week since Americans waited with bated breath to find out the fate of the country’s political landscape. And while most races were called within hours of polls closing on election night, the winner in Georgia’s race for governor is still a looming source of contention.

Democratic nominee Stacey Abrams’ has vowed not to concede until “every vote is counted,” which according to a new statement by her opponent, is a “disgrace to democracy.”

On Saturday, Republican candidate Brian Kemp’s office said that it is “mathematically impossible” for Abrams to force a runoff in the Georgia gubernatorial race, but that won’t stop Abrams from keeping her head in the race. According to a CNN poll, Republican candidate Kemp has a nearly 60,000 vote lead. Abrams insists that with every vote counted, that lead could dip below the 50% needed to declare Kemp the winner.

With most precincts already reporting, the countdown to declare a winner is quickly coming to an end.

In a response to Kemp’s statement, Abrams said Saturday night in an Instagram, “I am fighting to make sure our democracy works for and represents everyone who has ever put their faith in it. I am fighting for every Georgian who cast a ballot with the promise that their vote would count.”

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I am fighting to make sure our democracy works for and represents everyone who has ever put their faith in it. I am fighting for every Georgian who cast a ballot with the promise that their vote would count. Yesterday, I met with Tate, Cassandra, Nedghie, Angel, Surabhi, Delaney, Cazembe, Amari, and Arnaud – Georgia voters from all walks of life who experienced difficulty casting their ballots or helped those who were having trouble. Whether they were first time voters, volunteers, or elected officials, they all felt dismayed and disillusioned by a democracy whose hurdles and failures made it nearly impossible to vote. Some were only able to vote through tenacity and sheer force of will. Many were left voiceless altogether. And they are not alone. Over the last few days, our Voter Protection Hotline has heard countless stories of Georgia voters who fought for their right to vote, but for whatever reason, were prevented from casting their ballot. We heard stories from voters who took time off work to vote, only to be turned away at their assigned polling precinct and every polling place they visited. Students and military service members who requested absentee ballots, but their ballots never arrived or their completed ballots were "lost in the mail." First time voters and long-time voters whose names were "no longer on the list." Their voices deserve to be heard. They deserve justice. And that is why we will continue this fight. Make no mistake: Our democracy should work for all of us, regardless of political leanings, race, income, or region. Voting is a right, not a privilege. It is fundamental to our democracy and to our Georgia, and I will fight every single day until our government – a government of the people, by the people, and for the people – works for all of us.

A post shared by Stacey Abrams (@staceyabrams) on

The post also included stories of Georgian voters who faced pushback at the polls.

In the end Abrams concluded, “Voting is a right, not a privilege. It is fundamental to our democracy and to our Georgia, and I will fight every single day until our government – a government of the people, by the people, and for the people – works for all of us.”