Rachaell Davis
Dec, 04, 2017

Donald Trump's reckless social media antics have the American people scratching their heads yet again, but this time, it's on a much more serious note.

On Saturday, December 2, Trump sparked discussion over whether or not he had committed a criminal offense after he fired off a Tweet suggesting that he had knowledge of former White House National Security Adviser Michael Flynn lying to former FBI Director James Comey after Flynn himself plead guilty to doing so on Friday.

The revelation immediately prompted many to question whether or not Trump knew of Flynn's lies when he allegedly urged Comey to drop the investigation into Flynn's involvement with Russia's U.S. election meddling scandal — which would mean Trump had blatantly admitted to obstruction of justice via his tweet. Although the 71-year-old former reality star tried to steer the conversation elsewhere with several empty follow up tweets taking aim at Hillary Clinton, he ultimately weighed back in, suggesting that he never told Comey to stop investigating Flynn (despite Comey testifying that he did, under oath.)

According to CNN, Trump's lawyer John Dowd has responded to claim that he was the one who actually sent the tweet from Trump's account and even issued a statement on Monday morning suggesting that the President of the United States is somehow exempt from being guilty of obstructing justice.

"(The) President cannot obstruct justice because he is the chief law enforcement officer under (the Constitution's Article II) and has every right to express his view of any case," Dowd said.

Unfortunately for Trump and his lawyer, many Americans aren't quite convinced.

In light of Flynn's testimony, Trump maintains that while he had knowledge of some of what Comey told the FBI, he had no knowledge that he'd lied.