‘Tell People Of That Color To Quit Acting Like Animals’: Louisiana High School Teacher ‘Disciplined’ For Racist Comments About Kaepernick Nike Ad

Breanna Edwards Sep, 11, 2018

We all know that white people went ballistic after Nike released its daring, visionary ad featuring blacklisted NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who spearheaded the movement that prompted many other players to take the knee during the national anthem in protest of racial inequality.

But apparently one Louisiana high school teacher went full white hood, blasting the ad in a horrific racist rant on Facebook last week, which ended with her being “disciplined,” according to the New Orleans Advocate. 

Slidell High School math teacher Valerie Scogin later apparently voluntarily removed the post, but the damage had been already done.

“They don’t have to live in that country. They could go back,” Scogin wrote. “But it was their own people selling them into slavery to begin with and tearing (sic) them even worse in those countries of origin.”

Want a better neighborhood? Move. You don’t have to choose to live in those zip codes. Want to not be stereotyped, tell people of that color to quit acting like animals and perpetuating the stereotype,” she added.

Of course, people started arguing back with her disgusting statements, and Scogin at first tried to argue, before realizing that this was probably not a good idea and started promptly her apology tour.

You guys can probably guess how that story goes…Scogin was apparently frustrated, which prompted her racist remarks.

“Recently I posted a comment that may have been hurtful to some of you,” Scogin wrote on her own Facebook page, according to the Advocate. “In my reaction out of frustration at another Facebook post, I made some remarks that were against my better judgement and sensibilities. I now wish I hadn’t.”

“The last thing I want to do is hurt anyone. I apologize for what I said  and sincerely wish to avoid this in the future,” she added.

The St. Tammany school system, which Scogin works under, forbids employees from being on social media with current students, but has no clear guidelines about what type of content employees post.

However, school system spokesperson Meredith Mendez told the Advocate that, “The appropriate disciplinary action has been taken. I can’t comment further due to this being a personnel matter.”

Naturally, there is no clue as to what this “appropriate” discipline was.

And some individuals, like Slidell alum Skylar Broussard aren’t buying Scogin’s apology.

“Imagine comparing people of color to animals, then when you get caught you try to say you didn’t think it would hurt anyone,” Broussard said.