Mexico Border
Chip Somodevilla

Because that's not slavery...

Rachaell Davis
Jan, 06, 2017

For much of his 2016 presidential campaign, Donald Trump vowed to build a wall on the Mexican border as one of his several invasive strategies for U.S. immigration policy reform. Now that Trump officially on his way to the White House, a sheriff out of Massachusetts is weighing in with his unsolicited two cents on how to actually get the wall completed.

In the midst of  adding to Trump's outlandish reasoning for the necessity of the wall, Bristol County Sheriff Thomas Hodgson stated he believes tasking inmates from around the country with building the wall would be "powerful."

Right.

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"I can think of no other project that would have such a positive impact on our inmates and our country than building this wall,”Hodgson said during a swearing in ceremony on Wednesday according to The Huffington Post. "Aside from learning and perfecting construction skills, the symbolism of these inmates building a wall to prevent crime in communities around the country, and to preserve jobs and work opportunities for them and other Americans upon release, can be very powerful.” 

Last month, the Trump transition team reportedly worked with the Department of Homeland Security to identify 400 miles along the U.S. border where a wall could potentially live.

Trump and his team have remained silent on the Sheriff Hodgson's comments, however, the ACLU staff counsel Laura Rotolo called his suggestion to have "perverse." 

"The proposal is perverse, it’s inhumane and very likely unconstitutional,” Rotolo said. “It certainly has nothing to do with helping prisoners in Massachusetts or their families. It’s about politics.”