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Donald Trump Outright Defended Nazis
Danielle Kwateng-Clark
Oct, 25, 2017

White people are suffering.

While people of color were out protesting for basic rights our fellow White Americans were suffering in silence —until now. According to a poll done by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that the majority of White Americans feel like they're discriminated against.

"If you apply for a job, they seem to give the Blacks the first crack at it," said 68-year-old Tim Hershman of Akron, Ohio, "and, basically, you know, if you want any help from the government, if you're white, you don't get it. If you're Black, you get it."

Sidenote: White people get the majority of welfare in the United States.

From Jan 26 to April 9 the survey sampled 3,453 adults in the U.S. with 902 being White. Out of the White participants, 55 percent said they believe discrimination exist, with two groups distinguished from those who felt "white discrimination" and those who had never felt it but believed it existed. 

What's even more interesting is that the perception of discrimination is directly linked to income. Low to moderate income Whites believe opportunities were being taken from them by other ethnic groups —these Whites are said to be the ones Trump targeted during his campaign.  

Luckily NPR was able to talk to a White person who was on the other side of this discussion (read: someone with sense).

"I don't see how we can be discriminated against when, when we have all the power," retired community college English teacher Betty Holton, of Elkton, MD said, while chuckling in disbelief into her cellphone.

"Look at Congress. Look at the Senate. Look at government on every level. Look at the leadership in corporations. Look. Look anywhere."