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Michael Arceneaux
Dec, 18, 2017

Now that she's free from the White House job that many were never too sure actually involved work, Omarosa Manigault Newman is making the media rounds — presumably because we haven't suffered enough.

The first round was her exclusive interview with Good Morning America. I imagine Michael Strahan conducted the interview because he lost the game of rock, paper, scissors to both Robin Roberts and George Stephanopoulos, but as we've all since learned, Roberts surely had something to say about Omarosa all the same.

As a walking battle rapper, naturally Omarosa has decided to respond. Pulling deep into her background as a reality star villain, Omarosa did so with hyperbole and dramatics. Yes, during an appearance on Inside Edition (round two) Omarosa said in response, "That was petty. It’s a Black woman civil war."

One assumes she's not just singling out the celebrated GMA anchor. In her exchange with Strahan, Omarosa kept acting as if rumors of her being physically escorted out of the White House were all reported by a sole reporter: April Ryan. Meanwhile, both CBS News and the Wall Street Journal echoed Ryan's reporting. In other words, she's full of it. I know, you're "shocked."

In any event, Omarosa is also probably referring to CNN's Angela Rye, who has made it no secret that she cannot stand Omarosa after she hitched herself onto a white nationalist campaign and administration. I don't want to speak for all of Black people when I say this, but I'm almost certain that Rye's laughter could be heard in many a Black household upon word that Honeysuckle Lenin's chief of staff finally got his wish and rid himself of the former Apprentice star.

Mathematics was my arch-nemesis in school, so riddle me this: If there are a bunch of Black women on one side and only one on the other, what kind of civil war is this?

Additionally, a recent CNN segment featuring Black conservatives went on CNN and revealed that the White House had given them the go ahead to trash Omarosa to anyone that would listen.

Ayshia Connors, former deputy director of African American Political Engagement at the Republican National Committee, explained:

“Yeah, they told us to take the gloves off. They wanted us to share our experience. I mean, in my experience when I was at the RNC, and when other Black conservatives that were establishment folks were trying to engage her and trying to do black outreach, we were blocked. We were shut out. So, now that she went on and was talking about what her experience was in the White House and how uncomfortable she was, we got the OK to go ahead and express our stories.”

The other conservatives on the panel proceeded to corroborate the story.

If you recall, while on GMA, Omarosa made the following claim:

"I have seen things that made me uncomfortable, that have upset me, that have affected me deeply and emotionally, that has affected my community and my people. And when I can tell my story, it is a profound story that I know the world will want to hear."

But as Jonathan Lemire, a White House reporter for the Associated Press and MSNBC contributor, recalled, Omarosa defended President Honeysuckle Lenin's controversial remarks on racism — namely his comments about the violence in Charlottesville.

Yes, in August, Omarosa appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, and compared 45's response to those made by President Obama in year's past. Moreover, she invoked Black Lives Matter to defend a white supremacist on a racist's news program on a network known for peddling racism.

As embarrassing enough as that is, worse is that a White man pointed it all out.

So for those keeping score: multiple Black women don't rock with Omarosa for legitimate reasons, Black conservatives don't see it for her either (and long haven't), and even White men are calling her out for pretending to suddenly be bothered by the bigoted actions of a man who has been a bigot longer than I've been alive.

Since it's quite apparent that there's no getting rid of her, I suggest another stop on Omarosa's media tour: Iyanla, Fix My Life. Then again, that will probably end up another battle for her, too.