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It appears that the overwhelming amount of girls posted as missing may not be a part of a trend.

Danielle Kwateng-Clark
Mar, 17, 2017

In the past week, there has been an overwhelming response on social media to find missing girls, particularly Black and Latinx teenagers that have gone missing in the D.C. Metropolitan area.

 

 

But now, it appears that the overwhelming amount of girls posted as missing may not be a part of human trafficking like so many believed. A new law enforcement initiative to get people more active in finding missing persons may be the reason for all the discussion.

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As reported by Fox 5, “The number of missing persons reports has remained constant since 2014," Mayor Muriel Bowser said during a news conference. "What has changed is our way of getting that information out quickly and the tools that we are using to get that out."

Furthermore, authorities are saying that there are less missing this year, than in the past.

“The overwhelming majority of our missing persons quickly return home or are located," D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham said. "So far in 2017, 95 percent of our cases have been closed. In 2016, we had almost 1,000 fewer reports of missing persons than we had in 2012."

Chanel Dickerson, the new commander of the D.C. police Youth and Family Services Division doubled down on this saying, "So far in 2017, there have been 708 missing persons reports filed at Metropolitan Police Department, of which 674 have been closed, and 34 remain open."

What does this mean? 

We keep spreading information and assist authorities to find the missing.

As Farwz poignantly said on Twitter, "All black lives matter, and that includes the countless black girls going missing in the U.S. everyday with no answers."