The quarterback was adopted by Rick and Teresa Kaepernick as a child, gaining two siblings and becoming the youngest of three. 

Tom Szczerbowski
See All Photos

The retired HFL quarterback who was once known to rock long hair had the nerve to give Kaepernick some unsolicited employment advice.

Sydney Scott
Jul, 18, 2017

Former NFL quarterback Michael Vick has some poor advice for Colin Kaepernick — get a haircut if you want to get hired.

During an episode of FS1’s Speak For Yourself, Vick offered the former San Francisco 49er advice on how to rebuild his image, stating, "The most important thing that he needs to do is just try to be presentable.”

"The first thing we got to get Colin to do is cut his hair," Vick said.

"Listen, I'm not up here to try to be politically correct, but even if he puts cornrows in it, I don't think he should represent himself in that way in terms of just a hairstyle. Just go clean cut. Why not? You're already dealing with a lot of controversy surrounding this issue. What he needs to do is just try to be presentable."

"I just think perception and image is everything, and listen, it’s not the Colin Kaepernick that we’ve known since he entered the National Football League. And I’m just going off my personal experiences, but I love the guy to death and I want him also to succeed on and off the field. And this has to be a start for him.”

Doubtful that Kaepernick’s problem (read: his refusal to bow down to white supremacy) will be solved with a simple haircut, but Vick, who was found guilty on dog-fighting charges, says he was able to resurrect his career by rebranding. 

"I started to see what was most important and that was cleaning up, changing my image, not just for public perception but for the judge and everything I was about to get involved in. It was a difficult process and it was one that I didn’t like, but it was one that I had to accept."

Fans took to Twitter to blast Vick for the poor advice, with Kaepernick responding with the definition of Stockholm syndrome.

Sorry Vick, but a haircut isn’t likely to solve the issues of systemic racism.