Kendu Isaacs' Daughter Misses Her Relationship With Mary J. Blige 

On a recent episode of 'Growing Up Hip Hop' the young lady got real about the public divorce. 

In June Mary J. Blige settled her divorce with Kendu Isaacs after a 14-year marriage. The ending was tumultuous after accusations of infidelity and a huge payout that included child support for his children. But despite the dissolution of a life they once had, Isaacs’ daughter Brianna Latrise Isaacs would still like a relationship with Blige.

On a recent episode of Growing Up Hip Hop, the painter said she hasn’t spoken to Blige since she filed for divorce earlier this year. 

“Me and Mary —you know, I love her,” Isaacs said. “And I get it, there’s probably some things where she can’t talk to me right now. And I respect that. But to me it’s almost like I lost somebody.”

“I haven’t heard from you since you filed,” she said during the confessional. “It almost makes me feel like, ‘did I have something to do with it?’ Because she’s not talking to me. What did I do?”

Isaacs also explained to rapper, Pepa why she always felt connected to Blige. “I’m the black sheep of the family. When she came around, it was like, somebody gets me.”

Isaacs is currently a supporting cast member on WeTV’s Growing Up Hip Hop and has a son. 

Hide Transcript
How is it when you have this public Mary but then behind the scenes you're trying to find that strength of the woman you are? Well because when mentally you've been, how can I say it? Beaten down, manipulated In front of the world, you have to especially if you're in a relationship, you're trying to protect the person and you're trying to hold yourself together. So when you've been beaten down mentally, you go home and you suffer and you deal with that. I'm sorry. I'm speaking for everybody else. But I was beginning to think I was nothing. [LAUGH] You know, I was beginning to think those things. You know, there will be people who will say 'how is that possible' that Mary J, you know that my sister was murdered, I speak out for domestic violence awareness. I think a lot of women don't get that it doesn't matter economic, it doesn't matter race, it doesn't matter where you're from. You can find yourself in these situations. That make you feel like you're not that. Well, that's because being Mary Jane Blige, the celebrity, is secondary. I'm a human being at first. And I suffer just like everybody else. [APPLAUSE]