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Diddy Offers Nick Cannon A Home At 'Black-Owned' Revolt

"The only way we can change the narrative, educate, and uplift each other is if we do it together," wrote Diddy.
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA - APRIL 27: Diddy performs onstage at SOMETHING IN THE WATER - Day 2 on April 27, 2019 in Virginia Beach City. (Photo by Brian Ach/Getty Images for Something in the Water) Photo by Brian Ach/Getty Images for Something in the Water
By Keyaira Boone · July 16, 2020

Diddy is offering Nick Cannon refuge at Revolt TV. The entertainment mogul invited the TV personality to come to his cable network after he was ousted at ViacomCBS for allowing anti-Semitic remarks and theories on his podcast. 

“The only way we can change the narrative, educate, and uplift each other is if we do it together. Nick, my brother, I am here to support you fully in any way you need.⁣ What we are not going to do is turn our backs on our brothers and sisters when they challenge the system,” Diddy wrote on Instagram Wednesday. 

“Come home to @REVOLTTV which is truly BLACK OWNED,” he continued. “We got your back and love you and what you have done for the culture.” 

The music mogul punctuated his message with emojis of a Black fist and a red heart. 

During a conversation with former Public Enemy member Richard “Professor Griff” Griffin on his podcast, Cannon’s Class, Cannon said that Black people were the “true Hebrews.” He also made comments praising Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who’s known for making anti-Semitic comments.

The conversation resulted in a strong and swift backlash. ViacomCBS severed its business ties with him after the clip went viral earlier this week.

Cannon responded to their actions by releasing his own statement asking for an apology, demanding ownership of Wild ‘N Out and accusing the network of refusing to air advertisements related to the fight against police brutality. 

The TV host on Wednesday sent an apology to the Jewish community, writing on Twitter: “First and foremost I extend my deepest and most sincere apologies to my Jewish sisters and brothers for the hurtful and divisive words that came out of my mouth during my interview with Richard Griffin.”

Cannon added that the discussion perpetuated “the worst stereotypes” and he felt “ashamed” to have been a part of the dialogue.

“I want to assure my Jewish friends, new and old, that this is only the beginning of my education—I am committed to deeper connections, more profound learning and strengthening the bond between our two cultures today and every day going forward,” he concluded, adding that he spoke to rabbis who informed him instead of “chastising” him.