Here we go again. The Supreme Court agreed to re-hear an affirmative action case against the University of Texas' admission policies. In 2012, Abigail Fisher, a White applicant, sued the university, claiming that she was denied admission because of her race. An appeals court ruled in favor of the college, but Fisher is now challenging that decision. The hearing hasn't begun yet. [USA TODAY]

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Zubik v. Burwell is attempting to take the 2014 ruling of Burwell v. Hobby Lobby one step further.

Taylor Lewis
Mar, 23, 2016

Two years ago, the Supreme Court ruled that businesses with religious affiliations could refuse to offer Affordable Care Act health plans that include access to birth control, and now, the issue is back on the table.

ThinkProgress reports that justices are scheduled to begin hearing arguments in Zubik v. Burwell, a case that could close a loophole that the 2014 Burwell v. Hobby Lobby ruling left open. 

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Under the 2014 decision, Supreme Court justices ruled that Hobby Lobby officials could file paperwork that would permit employees to work directly with insurance companies in order to receive birth control. Though the ruling essentially added in steps for all parties involved, women would ultimately still have access to birth control.

However, Zubik v. Burwell seeks to eliminate that escape clause by arguing that companies should not play any part in helping their employees obtain birth control. Plaintiffs are demanding that they be exempt from filling out the paperwork, thus leaving employees to fend for themselves.

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So what does this mean for women? If justices rule in favor of Zubik, it’s safe to say that women’s reproductive rights will be wildly violated, considering that employers will have a say in whether or not a woman will be granted access to birth control. 

It’s unclear when a decision is expected.