Officer William Porter, right, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, arrives at a courthouse as jury deliberations continue in his trial, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015, in Baltimore Md. Jurors are in their third day of deliberations in the manslaughter trial of Porter.

AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Prosecutors now must decide whether they will place Porter on trial for a second time.

Taylor Lewis
Dec, 16, 2015

A Baltimore judge has declared a mistrial in the trial of William Porter, the first of six officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray, after jurors were unable to agree on a verdict, reports the Baltimore Sun.

A jury convened last month to decide the fate of Porter, who has been charged with involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office for failing to secure Gray in the police van and not getting him the appropriate medical attention.

Jury Deadlocked in Freddie Gray Trial, Judge Orders Jurors to Continue Deliberations

Yesterday afternoon, the 12-person jury—made up of of seven African-Americans—told a judge that they were unable to reach a verdict on any of the charges. The judge ordered them to continue deliberations, but declared a mistrial earlier this afternoon.

Prosecutors and defense attorneys will reportedly meet tomorrow to seek a new trial date. Porter could face up to 25 years in prison.