Former tennis pro James Blake is demanding an apology from the NYPD after an officer slammed him to the ground outside of a New York City hotel yesterday afternoon. A plainclothes police officer approached Blake because he reportedly fit the description of a man wanted for credit card fraud. Blake said that he was cooperating when the officer suddenly tackled him to the ground and handcuffed him. The encounter was captured on video, and the officer involved is currently on desk duty. [The New York Times]

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Blake was violently tackled and handcuffed last month when he was mistaken for a suspect in a credit card scheme

Taylor Lewis
Oct, 07, 2015

Less than one month after former tennis player James Blake was violently tackled and arrested outside of a New York City hotel, a city review board has found that that officer exercised excessive force.

On Sept. 9, Blake was standing outside of Manhattan's Grand Hyatt Hotel when he was approached by a plainclothes officer. Surveillance video shows Officer James Frascatore slamming Blake to the ground and handcuffing him. Blake was detained for 10 minutes before he was released. Frascatore later told officials that he had mistaken Blake for a suspect wanted in a credit card fraud scheme.

NYPD Releases Surveillance Footage of Police Tackling Tennis Pro James Blake in Wrongful Arrest

Since the incident, Blake has met with both New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton, who have apologized for the arrest and have promised reform.

Earlier today, the Civilian Complaint Review Board completed its investigation and recommended that Frascatore be either suspended or released. Additionally, the detective involved could have his vacation days docked.

"I want to express my appreciation to the Civilian Complaint Review Board for their quick and thorough review of the incident where I was attacked," Blake said in a statement. "I have complete respect for the principle of due process and appreciate the efforts of the C.C.R.B. to advance this investigation."

It is now up to NYPD officials to review Frascatore, who has had complaints against him in the past for using excessive force. The NYPD has not issued a comment.