Here's what's sweetening our coffee cups this morning: Willow and Jaden Smith could be getting their own fashion line. Those kids are fierce. Kanye West is a Tweeter. President Obama was not invited to Chelsea Clinton's wedding, and Congress wants to change the rules on crack cocaine possession. Here's what you had to say: Nicole commented via Facebook: "Can you imagine how many people will not be talking about the bride and groom, but about the President?" Anita wrote via Facebook: "I dont tweet, or follow anyone. Facebook is more than enough for me."

Essence.com
Jul, 29, 2010

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  • We're always looking to the young folks for fashion trends. It's only right that budding tastemakers Willow and Jaden Smith would get their own fashion lines. The young Smiths are said to be teaming up with Rihanna's stylist, Mariel Haenn, to create their personalized looks. "I think the ultimate goal is for Willow and Jaden to have their own line," Haenn said.  [EurWeb]
  • President Obama told the ladies on "The View" that he "was not invited to [Chelsea Clinton's] wedding." "I think Hillary and Bill, properly, want to keep this thing for Chelsea and her soon-to-be husband," he added. [People]
  • Kanye West joined Twitter yesterday. He's already got 219,018 followers. [Twitter]
  • Speaking of Twitter, while keeping up with Kanye West and the whereabouts of his celebrity buddies is fun, a recent survey shows that nobody would pay to tweet. [Time]
  • Janet Jackson is getting some flack for donning a luxury fur coat in Blackglama's "What Becomes a Legend Most" campaign. [People]
  • Congress voted to reduce the disparity in the sentencing of people caught with crack cocaine versus powder cocaine, but not by much. Formerly, crack users could be charged with a felony if they possessed only 5 grams of the drug compared to 500 grams of the powdered substance. The new law suggests that the crack cocaine threshold be 28 grams. [HP]
  • The personal details of 100 million Facebook users have been published on the Web by security consultant Ron Bowes, who says he published the information to draw attention to privacy issues. [BBC]

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