While most women take offense at being called the "B" word, Milwaukee City Council candidate Ieshuh Griffin (pictured) embraces it, and wants it put on a ballot, reports the Associated Press. To be exact, Griffin, an Independent running for a seat in the state's Assembly, wants the phrase "NOT the Whiteman's b-tch" placed next to her name on the ballot... Here's what you had to say: Anonymous commented: "She doesn't realize she is making a mockery of her campaign. If elected she will be not only representing Black voters but those White men she is calling out." Candy wrote: "Once again given the opportunity to elevate, we have fallen. If this young woman feels oppressed then why not be a positive lesson for what happens when you do get the chance to voice your opinions publicly?"

Essence.com
Jul, 22, 2010

While most women take offense at being called the "B" word, Milwaukee City Council candidate Ieshuh Griffin (pictured) embraces it, and wants it put on a ballot, reports the Associated Press. To be exact, Griffin, an Independent running for a seat in the state's Assembly, wants the phrase "NOT the Whiteman's b-tch" placed next to her name on the ballot. But the Wisconsin election oversight board was not in agreement last night as they voted against the phrase, calling it racially charged. Griffin argued her case in front of the board's five White judges, and called the phrase "freedom of expression." "It's not a racial slur. It's not a slur," she said. "I'm not making a derogatory statement to a group of people or an ethnic group." Currently working as a community activist, Griffin argued that her the term is one her "constituents identify with." All candidates in Wisconsin are allowed to use five words to describe themselves that will be placed next to their names on the ballot. The phrase cannot be perjorative, profane or discriminatory. Griffin has threatened to take her case to the Supreme Court. What do you think? Freedom of expression or offensive?