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Ivy League Student, Jameel Mohammed, Debuts Stunning Jewelry Collection At New York Fashion Week

It’s not everyday that a 21-year-old college student gets to debut their jewelry collection at New York Fashion. But then again, Jameel Mohammed is not your average undergrad. 

 

The University of Pennsylvania student has managed to design a stunning fine jewelry line, KHIRY, which is inspired by the Black diaspora. He raised $20k to produce it. And did it all while pursuing his desgree in political science. We caught up with him during his New York Fashion Week debut to chat about this amazing accomplishment and drool over his covetable designs. 

SHOW TRANSCRIPT

[SOUND] [BLANK_AUDIO] To tell a story that could never be told before. Yeah. I'm Jameel Mohammed. I'm the creative director at KHIRY. I'm a student at student at Penn showing at New York Fashion Week. It's a crazy schedule, it's a little bit insane, but it's incredibly gratifying, I'm glad to be here, it's a mind boggling experience, because you don't think that as a 21 year old, you could be doing something so expansive and be talking to people as interesting as Julie or [UNKNOWN] and so it's really just, I don't know, it's like, it's a mind boggling experience and one that I can't conceive of quite yet. Kyrie is inspired by the African diaspora. I think the thing that makes Kyrie a little bit different is the source of inspiration that we take. There are very few luxury fashion houses that are exploring references outside of a western, or European context, and I think that with Kyrie I really wanted to explore things that aren't from Europe, that aren't from the United States, but are From African diaspora, so if that's Cuba, if that's Haiti, if that's Brazil, what are the different points of culture that are important to the people in those different places? And how do they express those things? And how can you reinterpret those into really beautiful luxury goods? It's not just about the production of jewelry for the sake of jewelry sake. It's really about, Communicating a new understanding of what luxury can mean and what it can look like and what it can say about the world. And who we can speak to. And so that's ultimately what I'm gonna do. [BLANK_AUDIO]