Miss USA 2017 Clarifies Controversial Statements About Healthcare And Feminism

So does Kára McCullough really think feminism is about hating men?

Miss USA 2017 Kára McCullough is hoping to gain some redemption by clearing up the two controversial statements she made during the competition show on Sunday.

The 25-year-old who hails from D.C. was asked about healthcare and feminism, to which she responded with fairly conservative responses.

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When asked if healthcare was a right or privilege, she said it was a privilege because she "had a job" that provided the option. And she also dismissed being a feminist, saying, "I try to not consider myself this die-hard. You know, 'Ah, I don't really care about men' [person]."

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RELATED: DC Does it Again! Miss USA 2017 Is Kara McCullough, Miss District of Columbia

McCullough took home the prize —becoming the second contestant in a row from D.C. to win the honor— but also faced backlash for her sentiments. On Tuesday she appeared "Good Morning America" with Michael Strahan to clear up her remarks. 

"I believe that's what America is based on, having opinions and views," she told Strahan about the chatter on Twitter. "But I would like to take this moment to try just clarify, because I am a woman, and I want to own what I said. I am privileged to have healthcare and I do believe that it should be a right, and I hope and pray moving forward that healthcare is a right for all worldwide."

Strahan noted that she only had 30 seconds to deliver an answer on stage, and asked if she would change anything she said.

"I would like to clarify," she responded. "I want people to know where I'm coming from. I have a job and look at healthcare like it is a privilege."

She also responded to the feminism answer she gave.

"Where I work at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 'equalism' is more of a term of understanding that no matter your gender, you are still given the same kind of accolades on your work. So I believe the person does a good job, they should be credited for that," she said.

Adding, "But I don't want anyone to look at it like I'm not for women's rights, because I am. We deserve a lot when it comes to opportunity in the workplace. As well as leadership positions. And I've seen and witnessed firsthand the impact women have."

Ok, sis. 

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