Social Media Checks Man Who Says Black Women Are Not 'Coachable'

Photo by Alija
Here we go again. 

Black women are tired. To put it more melodically, we're "weary of the ways of the world".

Not only do we have to defend our agency as women, we also have to simultaneously represent the Black race. We're oppressed by socioeconomic conditions that historically have paid us less, for the same or more work. Yet, somehow we're the most educated in the U.S. Oh! And we're also birthing babies and raising them.

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But the saddest narrative is when we have to explain the false notion that we're of lesser worth to a select group of men within our race.

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As reported by BallerAlert, someone on Instagram posed the question, "Why do Black athletes marry white women?" Initially the account was linked to Lynden Trail of the Washington Redskins, but he quickly cleared that up with a photo of his very Black family. 

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Nonetheless, the question was raised and someone with the handle of Maserati Rick —which should be noted is the nickname of a well-known Detroit drug dealer who died in the 80s—responded. 

"The answer is simple, brother," he begins. "Most of the sisters were raised in broken homes and they don't have proper guidance to how they should treat a man, so they mess up a lot in relationships. The biggest difference is that a white woman knows her position and accepts her role as a woman and let's her man lead."

"You can never get better at anything unless you can admit your fears and your mistakes. How would I be a better football player, if I'm not coachable? Black women are not coachable. Let's put it that way."

Well, finally. A valid explanation from an internet scholar about the dynamic between Black men and women. It's all about being "coachable." Problem solved. 

Immediately the post got comments (over 7,500 to be exact) and was then brought over to Twitter where Black women rightfully went in. 

 

https://twitter.com/ChefResha/status/842394763315822592

 

 

https://twitter.com/thetrudz/status/842394798329892864

 

 

https://twitter.com/cindasmommy/status/842382279146147840

https://twitter.com/cindasmommy/status/842382279146147840

 

https://twitter.com/JamilahLemieux/status/842338953709658112

 

https://twitter.com/pants_so_short/status/842369718405238784

 

The truth is, nothing concerning human beings is cut and dry. Using umbrella statements to try to explain a perceived trend, is idiotic. But let's be clear, the majority of married Black men are wed to Black women (88 percent).

It also must be noted that in this socio-political climate change we're in, the traditional concept of submission will evolve as well. Women being breadwinners completely remixes the idea of genders roles, especially when you talk about non-gender conforming individuals.

Just last month, Tampa Bay quarterback Jameis Winston was under fire for telling a group of fifth grade boys to stand up while the girls should sit down.

“All my boys, tell me one time: I can do anything I put my mind to," he said. "Now a lot of boys aren’t supposed to be soft-spoken... But the ladies, they’re supposed to be silent, polite, gentle. My men, my men (are) supposed to be strong."

To which a little girl in the class turned to an adult and said, “But I’m strong!”

The little girl got the point, which is that no one, regardless of race or gender, should feel comfortable being subservient to another group. That's not how freedom works.

To make life easier, it may help if everyone learns to be open for growth. It would also help if simple-minded men check their ego before jumping onto a public forum. 

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Filed under: Culture, News