From Broke to Blessed: How to Earn Multiple Streams of Income

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In the final installment of her 5-part series, Leslie E. Royal shares five types of gigs that can help you get paid!

Collette M. Hopkins, 63, has been on a mission to secure her future for some time. She’s a full time project director for the Education Advocacy Project earning $65,000 per year and a part-time Education Coach for Families First, Inc. getting paid $22,000 annually.  She is the CEO of Diaspara U, LLC and can pull down $2,500 to $5,000 per event.  To top it all off, Hopkins is a consultant to arts organizations such as CultureFest, Hammonds House Museum, HERO for Children and the National Black Arts Festival.  She earns $500 to $2500 per experience.

Hopkins says that having numerous jobs provides independence, security and allows her to donate to causes that she supports.  The gravy train wasn’t always rolling for her.  “My job with the National Black Arts Festival initially paid no money,” says Hopkins.

RELATED: From Broke to Blessed: Getting Out of Credit Card Debt

If you are like Hopkins and have specific goals in life and desire to secure your future, it is a good idea to have several sources of income.  There are numerous careers, jobs or gigs that allow you to get your side hustle going.  “You need multiple streams of income to truly thrive, build wealth and weather the eventual emergencies,” says Maria James, founder of Pocket of Money, LLC.  “Whether you are an entrepreneur or professional, the quickest way to add other streams of income is to use your knowledge.” 

Want extra money to pay bills, take a vacation, education, shopping, retirement or to launch your dream career? One of these five job categories will help you add much needed earnings to your coffers. Solicit referrals from family, friends and business associates as well as utilize a website, LinkedIn, Facebook business page, Twitter and Instagram to get you started.

RELATED: Do You Have A Side Hustle?

1. Independent Services – Contractor or Consultant.  Like Hopkins, become a consultant or contractor in your particular field of expertise.  She was able to effectively parlay her educational background and initially pro bono commitment into several lucrative and interrelated jobs.   “You can start consulting. It is one of the fastest ways to set up a side hustle,” says James.  “This is where you’ll trade your time and expertise for money.” -- How to Do It – Use Nolo.com’s Self-Employed Consultants & Contractors Link.

2. Web Services – Blogger or Podcaster.  If you have a hobby or special interest, turn that passion into profit online.   “Many people, myself included, make money blogging through a podcast.  One very popular podcaster who now teaches others how to do it is John Lee Dumas of Entrepreneurs on Fire,” says Rob Berger, founder of Doughroller.net.  -- How to Do It – Go to Doughroller.net. Read “How to Be a WELL-PAID Freelance Blogger” by Carol Tice and “Podcasting for Promotion, Positioning & Profit” by Kris Gilbertson.

3. Beauty Services – Hairstylist, Manicurist or Makeup Artist.  Become licensed in this industry that can prove quite lucrative for you.  Like Hopkins, offer comp services to make the right connections. Attend trade shows and keep up with trends. Set your sight your sight on the “stars”.  Find a way to connect with influential people and VIPs.   “The earning potential for a great hairstylist and makeup artist can easily top 100k per year,” says Dennis Stokely, American Idol and celebrity hairstylist.  “Become very specialized in your field.  Focus your efforts on the skill set that will get you the most bookings.” -- How to Do It – Read “How to Get a J.O.B. in a Salon” by Jeff Grissler.  Attend presentations like Stokely’s “Master Class in the Art & Business of the Beauty Industry”.

4. Executive Services – Scheduler, Personal Shopper or Personal Assistant.  James, known as The Money Scientist™ because of her PhD in the field and application of analytical teaching to money management, says some executives and professionals are just too busy for the tasks of shopping and scheduling.  Create a niche for yourself in this area.   As for a personal assistant, “if you don’t mind running around a bit, this may be great way to bring in side income,” says James.  I’ve seen $50 an hour for these services.  Start at a lower point until you’ve gained positive referrals and recommendations.”  -- How to Do It – Go to SterlingStyleAcademy.com and check out their training programs.

5. Buy and Sell Services – Bazaars, Flea Markets or Online.  Create your own arts and crafts such as crocheted and knitted items, woodwork, ornaments and jewelry.  Bake or make unique edibles.  You can also buy new or used merchandise at substantially discounted prices.   Sell them at modest introductory prices and then raise the price as the items gain popularity.  “There are countless ways to earn multiple streams of income.  One of the more popular is to make money online,” says Berger.  “A good friend buys items from second-hand stores and sells them on eBay.  She earns enough to pay for her family’s annual trip to Germany.”  -- How to Do It – Go to Websites like Etsy.com, Ebay.com and Craig’s List. Read “WordPress. Wow! How to Create a Website To Sell Your Stuff Even If You’re a Beginner in Just 2 Hours: Step-by-Step with Pics” by Garth Scaysbrook.

Sidebar 1 - Three Extra Gigs To Earn You Quick Cash

1. Home Services – house cleaning, lawn cutting, babysitting and pet sitting

2. Entertainment Services – D.J., mixologist, balloon modeler, face painter

3. Seasonal Services – summer camp, snow shoveling and holiday work at retail stores

Sidebar 2- The Money Scientist™ Guide to Resources for Earning More Income

1. I Will Teach You to Be Rich (Workman) by Ramit Sethi

2. The Smart Passive Income Blog by Patt Flynn

3. Entrepreneur On Fire Business Podcasts by John Lee Dumas

4. Budgets Are Sexy Website (More than 50+ Side Hustles) by J. Money

5. The 4-Hour Work Week (Crown/Random House) by Timothy Ferriss

Leslie E. Royal is a Personal Finance Writer and the Creator of Leslie’s Lane, a consumer information blog. 

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